2022 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD RST Review



The Tahoe RST is a big vehicle with big power.

The Tahoe RST is a big vehicle with big power. (Ross Ballot/)

The deep burble from the 6.2L Chevrolet V-8 should be coming from the tailpipe of something lewd and lascivious like a Corvette. But it isn’t. Instead, the source of the snarl is the back of a 2022 Chevrolet Tahoe RST. It’s an enormous vehicle with the ability to haul off-road vehicles to your heart’s content. But is this sportier Tahoe any good in practice, or is it just a contrived attempt to fill every niche?

The Tahoe 4WD RST is certainly a good-looking rig, if a bit overwrought.

The Tahoe 4WD RST is certainly a good-looking rig, if a bit overwrought. (Ross Ballot/)

Chevrolet has aimed the 2022 Tahoe 4WD RST at people who need a comfy rig with decent towing capacity, but want a little visual aggression and sporty flair at the same time. Our test rig came with the optional 6.2L V-8 and a paint scheme that evokes Chevy’s performance cars. The enormous 22-inch wheels and RST badges are dead giveaways that this is the sporty trim, but base RSTs come with a 5.3L V-8. It’s not a bad engine, but with this much size and visual panache, you’ll want the big-boy power of the 6.2L to match the truck’s looks.

The RST’s 22-inch wheels wouldn’t be our choice for an SUV for towing use.

The RST’s 22-inch wheels wouldn’t be our choice for an SUV for towing use. (Ross Ballot/)

Inside, the RST is familiar fare. GM has done well separating the Tahoe, Yukon, and Escalade from one another, and yet, even with the bow tie logos covered, the RST’s interior is immediately recognizable as the Chevy. The soft seats are comfortable over the long haul, but the chairs might be slightly narrow for bigger occupants. For the Tahoe’s $72,445 as-tested price we expected the seats to be heated and cooled. These make do solely with heaters.

The interior is almost solid black and oddly lacks a sunroof, which makes for a pretty dreary place to spend time. Still, most of the accoutrements associated with vehicles at this price point are present. Chevy equipped it with wireless Apple CarPlay and Android Auto and a wide suite of safety features, such as automatic emergency braking, pedestrian braking, lane keep assist, and automatic high beams. Nice as it is, the Tahoe’s interior pales in comparison to that of the GMC Yukon Denali.

The interior is excellent if you stay in the $60,000 bracket, but is a bit lacking at the $72,000 MSRP of our tester.

The interior is excellent if you stay in the $60,000 bracket, but is a bit lacking at the $72,000 MSRP of our tester. (Ross Ballot/)

The 6.2 feels right at home in the Tahoe. It delivers effortless power around town and a sublime experience, though it’s a bit quiet for our taste. A freer flowing exhaust would go a long way to giving the big V-8 the impact it deserves. The transmission tuning is excellent, and around town the seamless shifts push the 6.2 to the spotlight of the RST experience.

As solid as the V-8 is, we’d pick the 3.0L “baby Duramax” diesel for constant towing and highway cruising. The diesel blew the 6.2′s indicated 15 mpg average out of the water, averaging 26 mpg during our week with it. Conditions weren’t identical, but we don’t expect much difference from these circumstances in the real world. The 3.0L Duramax is available in the RST trim for 2022.

The RST looks good on its own or hooked up to a trailer.

The RST looks good on its own or hooked up to a trailer. (Ross Ballot/)

As good as the engine is, we couldn’t help but feel some of the other parts of the RST package didn’t measure up. The 22-inch wheels mean stiff, tiny sidewalls, which make the ride crashy over bumps and potholes. In snowy, muddy, or particularly hilly low-speed towing applications, we’d want the Z71 model’s two-speed transfer case versus the RST’s single-speed box, as it lacks the traditional low range offered by two-speed.

The 6.2L-powered Tahoe uses, as far as we could tell, the same brakes as the base, 5.3L model. To be blunt, they’re out of their depth hauling a 420 hp, 5,600-pound SUV down to a stop from speed. Towing exacerbates that.

Form over function.

Form over function. (Ross Ballot/)

The Tahoe RST still proved a worthy companion for our towing use, despite being underbraked. We recommend a drop hitch for towing with the Tahoe. Hooking up a trailer requires removing the bumper cover that hides the hitch, but everything is normal after that. The Tahoe has a tow mode setting, which holds gears longer to keep up with the extra weight.

The Tahoe uses its generous center screen to ease hooking up a trailer and help monitor the load once you’re underway. It’s not as in-depth as some others we have used but it works. Overall, the Tahoe tows with ease and without fuss. The chassis easily copes with the trailer and there’s no abnormal sway of any kind. Getting up to speed is easy, though the 6.2′s torque band is decidedly less suited to this usage duty than the 3.0L diesel. Passing on the highway requires a few downshifts, whereas we found the Duramax capable of doing the same by just dipping into its torque band.

The quad exhaust tips are set just far enough apart to stay out of the line of fire while towing.

The quad exhaust tips are set just far enough apart to stay out of the line of fire while towing. (Ross Ballot/)

Overall, that’s emblematic of the Tahoe RST experience, particularly with the 6.2L. It has serious curb appeal, but the charm is mostly skin-deep. The RST is a good option if you plan to stick mostly to paved roads and limited towing, but want the boy-racer appearance.

It’s not that we dislike the RST, it’s just that we prefer the Z71 with the baby Duramax to the 6.2L V-8 and 22-inch wheels that only add bragging rights and sporty looks to the package.

It’s not that we dislike the RST, it’s just that we prefer the Z71 with the baby Duramax to the 6.2L V-8 and 22-inch wheels that only add bragging rights and sporty looks to the package. (Ross Ballot/)

We’d either spend our money on a Z71 package with the 5.3L V-8, or something with the 3.0L Duramax. The big V-8 is a fantastic powerplant but is ill-suited to this application, and the other offerings suit the truck’s purpose and demeanor more appropriately. The 2022 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD starts at $61,300 but our test unit was optioned up to $72,445.

The Tahoe is a good truck that can be configured almost any which way you want it. Which is good, because ours wouldn’t look like this.

2022 Chevrolet Tahoe 4WD RST Specs

MSRP:$61,300 (base) / $72,445 (as tested)
Engine:DOHC, direct injection, gasoline V-8; 2 valves/cyl.
Displacement:6.2L
Bore x Stroke:4.06 x 3.62 in. (103.25 x 92.0mm)
Compression Ratio:11.5:1
Transmission:10-speed automatic
Claimed Horsepower:420 hp @ 5,600 rpm
Claimed Torque:460 lb.-ft. @ 4,100 rpm
Fuel System:EFI
Steering:Electric power steering
Drivetrain:Single-speed transfer case 4WD w/ mechanical limited-slip rear differential
Front Suspension:Coilover shocks
Rear Suspension:Multi-link
Brakes, Front/Rear:Four-wheel vented antilock disc brakes
Wheels, Front/Rear:Bright machined aluminum wheels; 22 in.
Tires, Front/Rear:All-terrain; 275/50R-22
Length:210.7 in.
Width:81.0 in.
Height:75.9 in.
Wheelbase:120.9 in.
Towing Capacity:7,700 lb.
Max Seating Capacity:8
Max Ground Clearance:8.0 in.
Turning Radius:N/A
Claimed Wet Weight:5,553 lb.
Fuel Capacity:24.0 gal.
Warranty:3-year/36,000-mile basic, 5-year/60,000-mile powertrain
Availability:Now
Contact:chevrolet.com/suvs/tahoe



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